Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Language School Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation General IELTS Grammar IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation ISIC Language School Life in Reading Listening online english Reading Reading University skills Solent University Southampton Southampton University Universities in UK Vocabulary

The Benefits of Extensive Reading

Extensive reading – what is it?

Well, it’s like intensive reading: intensive reading for English classes or finding answers for your YES / NO /NOT GIVEN questions in IELTS, but for fun! Extensive reading is reading something that you enjoy or are interested in and lots of it; extensive reading is just reading, and it should be for enjoyment, interest or pleasure.

Reading is a mental activity as opposed to TV which is not; TV is purely visual (although TV is good for listening comprehension and pronunciation among other things, but that’s another story).

Everyone including those of us learning a second language can benefit from extensive reading. Carrel and Grabe (2010) argue that language learners can improve their comprehension and vocabulary by doing a little extensive reading. According to Julian Bamford and Richard Day (in Kreuzova 2019) you should read as much as you can on a variety of topics that you have chosen; the materials should be easily understandable to you from books, newspapers and magazines.

Extensive reading is moving away from the intensive reading of answer identification in your Cambridge, TOEFL or IELTS exams, and the reading skills of skimming and scanning toward a more relaxed form of reading; the kind of reading you do on the sofa because you want to, because there is nothing on TV or there’s nothing on your streaming service worth watching. So, think about what you like to read; are you interested in reading about what English-language newspapers say about your country or region; are you interested in learning about your own country’s history from another perspective? Like cooking? Read a few recipes? Remind yourself, what do you like reading in your own language: try reading the same in English.

I was surprised when I started to learn about British history from the Spanish and Argentinians. I never knew the British invaded Buenos Aries in the nineteenth century. I never knew the Dutch sailed up the Themes and stole the English flagship. It has also been suggested that extensive reading helps in examination results, make them more aware of the grammar when they are reading, increase a learner’s reading proficiency and by extension their vocabulary learning (Prowse, 2000) and (Liu and Zhang 2018).

There are other beneficial effects. It is generally believed that reading develops your concentration. When you’re watching TV, you’re probably doing something else: chatting, eating, doing your nails, interacting with social media, but reading, well reading is a different matter.

Now don’t get me wrong, I love binge-watching The Man in the High Castle on a lazy Saturday afternoon trying to forget work. With a book, you need to concentrate and focus on what is written and everything that it implies. Which brings me to another thing reading improves: your imagination. You can lose yourself in a character or situation, imagining yourself in their situation. Imagine yourself as a different person or asking yourself what you would do in such a situation.

In turn, reading is a good de-stressor; you are more likely to read when you’re in a quiet room, with no TV and oblivious to the world outside and exercising the most important organ in your body – your brain. So, while you are doing whatever you are doing like channel hoping, you are not using your imagination. We switch off our imaginations, but with a book we use our imaginations to a greater extent. Reading enhances your verbal skills; TV is visually-based media and normally uses short and simple sentences whereas books contain complex language more than you would find on TV or in a streaming service. This means using a greater range of vocabulary, longer sentences and more complex sentences; you can become aware of punctuation. So, go and borrow a graded reader from your school’s resource centre, borrow a book from the city library or read some on-line articles in magazines or newspapers on-line.

by Chris Scott, March 2020

Reference List

Carrel, Patricia. L., and Grabe, W. (2010). Reading. In: N. Schmitt, ed., Applied Linguistics, 2nd London: Hodder Education, Page 215- 229.

Sarka Kreuzova 17 July 2019, Encouraging Extensive Reading, English Teaching Professional (1 09), viewed 31 December 2019, < https://www.etprofessional.com/encouraging-extensive-reading >.

Philip Prowse (2000), The secret of reading, English Teaching Professional, (13), viewed 2 January,2020, < https://www.etprofessional.com/the-secret-of-reading >

Liu. J., and Zhang. J., (2018). ‘The Effects of Extensive Reading on English Vocabulary Learning: A Meta-analysis ‘, English Language Teaching; Vol. 11, No. 6; 2018, viewed 2 January 2020, < https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1179114.pdf >

Categories
Academic IELTS apps B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation free apps General IELTS Grammar IELTS Preparation Language Learning Learn English Listening online english Solent University Southampton University Summer School

Listening

When we listen to something, it often goes in one ear and out the other – as the popular English idiomatic expression goes, or it falls on deaf ears, but that shouldn’t happen if you want to improve your listening skills; you should be all ears.

Ears – ears are important; they are our auditory apparatus attuned to sound waves created by the vocal cords of others; our ears pick up sound waves; the ear transforms these waves into intelligible signals that our brains can understand. 

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Captu785re-1.png

Listening for communication is to understand the spoken word; as students need to understand what speech is; sentence intonation and stress that maybe focusing on specific information and interpreting the context and topic – stress, intonation, rhythm and the paralinguistic features such as intonation or volume loudness.  A familiar cry from us all when doing a listening exercise in a language class is ‘I don’t understand’.

Normally, in a teaching class where you are leaning the language, as opposed to exam orientation and familiarization, your teacher will play the recording at least twice maybe more using one or more activities; you may even have the transcript to help you.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Captu664re.png

But why is listening a problem? Is it you? Is it the quality of the recording? Is it noise pollution from elsewhere in the school or from the traffic outside? Are the accents of the speakers strange or unintelligible? Is the recording not being played enough times? Are the speakers talking too fast?

A lot of the listening comprehension problems stem from unfamiliarity with a speaker’s accent; their speed of delivery, idiomatic language and perhaps most importantly from technical elements of pronunciation that the listeners, us the students, haven’t been acquainted with such as pronunciation, recognising contractions, understanding the reduction and blending of sentences at word or cluster level; the adding of extra sounds in rapid conversation between words and the many English words where we don’t pronounce all the syllables or sounds, for example chocolate where it is pronounced choc-late.

There are also may words that sound the same in rapid speech; words that sound almost the same ‘cab’ and ‘cap’, ‘sheep’ and ‘ship’. There is also the familiarity learners have with one particular type of accent; as learners, we have to be open to the fact that speakers of a particular language, be it English, Spanish or Chinese have various accents and speeds of delivery. If we become accustomed to just one accent, we will have difficulties understanding the range of accents spoken by ‘native’ English speakers from across the English-speaking world and more importantly those speakers of English whose first language isn’t English who outnumber native speakers.

Types of Listening

 So, what types of listening do we do? There are perhaps two types of listening we do not only as language learners but also in our mother tongue; firstly, there is the listening we do in class or a lecture theatre or on TED Talks;  the language here is high in information; we listen for the most part passively; we also watch TV in this way – passively, unless we are shouting at our football team or a politician, but on TV the spoken language is more dynamic with a range of styles formal informal, spontaneous, chatty and prepared.  The second type of listening we do isactive, possibly in a conversation, where we have to understand the subtle cues of politeness and turn taking in a conversation.  In this type of listening where we are participating, non-linguistic features like body language and facial expressions are used to get our meaning across. 

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Cap5t5ure-1.png

When I learned Spanish, I spent two years just watching Spanish-language soap operas, mini series and movies; the actors had a variety of accents and came from many different countries.  As such my listening skills are now very good; it required dedication.

So, how do you improve your listening skills? Listen to as much radio, music and TV as possible; listen to as many accents as possible and learn how the language is pronounced.

By Chris Scott, March 2020

Categories
Academic IELTS apps B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English Language Learning Learn English Reading skills Study Abroad travel websites

発音の向上

 

ハッキリとした発音はコミュニケーションにおいて、とても重要な役割を果たします。発音をおろそかにすると、恥ずかしい思いをしたり気まずい状況に陥ってしまうこともあり、発音練習の意欲をなくしてしまうこともあります。以下では、自宅でリラックスしながら発音練習をして自信をつける、さまざまなヒントをご紹介します。 

鏡とBBCの発音練習ビデオを利用する 

発音は運動の一つです。正しい発音をするには口の形に注意することが大切です。 「BBC Learning English」のビデオと鏡を利用して、難しい発音の訓練をしましょう。 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/features/pronunciation

自分の発音を録音する 

初めは少し違和感を感じるかもしれませんが、自分の発音を録音することで、何を修正する必要があるのかを実感できます。映画やテレビ番組のセリフを繰り返し発音し、聴き返してみて本物の発音と比べてみましょう。さらに、口の形を分析するために、発音している姿をビデオに撮るのもよいでしょう。 

 Siri」に話しかける 

Siri、Alexa、Googleなどの瞬時にあらゆる情報を提供してくれるAIアシスタントは、多くの人々に利用されています。しかし、これらの賢い機能が発音向上にも役立つということをご存じですか?言語設定を英語にして会話をしてみましょう。とくに難しいと感じた発音フレーズを書き留めておき、それらを発音してみてAIアシスタントが理解できるかを確認してみましょう。 

歌をうたう 

歌をうたう行為は気分を上げる効果だけでなく、発音練習にも効果があります。歌詞がついた曲のミュージックビデオをみてみましょう。まずは慣れるまで何度か聴いて、その後歌手に合わせて歌をうたってみます。必要に応じて停止したりリピートしたりして、練習しましょう。 

Categories
apps B1 Test English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Southampton free apps freeapps IELTS Exam Preparation international student card Language Learning Language School online english Reading skills Solent University Southampton Southampton University Summer School websites

Mejora tu Listening

Si estás intentando mejorar tu audición en inglés, es importante que escuches tanto como sea posible sobre temas en los que estás realmente interesado – si no estuvieras escuchando ese tema en tu lengua materna, probablemente tampoco querrías escucharlo en inglés.

Letra de canciones: Primero, elige una canción en inglés que te guste. Luego busca el video lírico correspondiente (video musical con letras) en YouTube, escucha la canción y cántala con la ayuda de las letras.  

Películas/ programas de televisión: Piensa en un género que te guste. Busca una película o programa de televisión en inglés de ese género y mírala!  

BBC Radio 4: Si tu inglés ya es relativamente bueno, intenta escuchar BBC Radio 4. No hay música, pero hay muchas conversaciones en forma de programas que se ven a menudo en la televisión inglesa.  

Intercambio de idiomas: Busca a alguien con quien puedas practicar inglés. ¿Por qué no te reúnes con alguien y hablas? Te verás obligado no sólo a hablar por ti mismo, sino también a escuchar lo que dice tu contraparte. 

TED Talks: TED Talks es un sitio web con muchas presentaciones en inglés. Las presentaciones son sobre muchos temas diferentes, así que puedes elegir algo que te interese. También es posible activar y desactivar los subtítulos. Es una buena idea escuchar la presentación una vez sin subtítulos y luego de nuevo con los subtítulos para buscar algo que se te haya pasado por alto o que no hayas entendido. 

English version https://eurospeak.ac.uk/eurospeakblog/2019/01/04/improve-your-listening/

Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Learn English Reading Southampton

ESPECULAR SOBRE LAS FOTOS EN LOS EXÁMENES DE EXPRESIÓN ORAL

¿Te preguntas qué decir cuando tienes que hablar de fotos en tu examen de expresión oral? Especular es la respuesta. “Pero ¿qué es especular y cómo lo hago?” Te oigo preguntar. Sigue leyendo para obtener la respuesta. 

Especular es cuando adivinas algo basado en la evidencia, y usar modales de especulación es una gran manera de especular. Aquí tienes algunos ejemplos: 

 

 

I think hmust be happy because he’s smiling. 

 

Aquí usamos must + bare / base infinitive para mostrar que estás casi completamente seguro de que algo es verdad. 

 

He’s looking at a website, so he could be looking for another job. 

 

Aquí temenos could + be + ing para mostrar posibilidad. 

 

He looks injured. I reckon he might have broken his leg. 

 

Aquí usamos might + have + past participle para mostrar posibilidad. 

 

She seems tired, so I think she may have been working very hard today. 

 

Aquí temenos may + have + been + ing para mostrar posibilidad 

 

También podemos usar can’t para mostrar que estás casi completamente seguro de que algo no es cierto, por ejemplo: 

 

She can’t have slept enough last night because she looks tired. 

 

Los dos primeros ejemplos son sobre el presente. Si estás haciendo el examen B2 First, puedes impresionar a los examinadores usando modales de especulación en el presente. 

 

Los últimos tres ejemplos son sobre el pasado. Si estás realizando el examen C1 Advanced, puedes impresionar a los examinadores utilizando modales de especulación del pasado. 

 

Por lo tanto, no te quedes sin palabras cuando tengas que hablar de fotos en tu examen de expresión oral. Especula basado en lo que puedes ver y usa modales de especulación para hacerlo. 

 

Categories
Academic IELTS apps B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Language School Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation free apps GCSE English IELTS Preparation Language Learning Learn English online english Reading Solent University Southampton Southampton University websites

Aprende inglés en cualquier momento y en cualquier lugar

Algunas de las mejores y más divertidas formas de practicar inglés también pueden ser completamente gratis. Todo lo que necesitas es un teléfono móvil y conexión a Internet, y tendrás acceso a una increíble selección de aplicaciones que pueden ayudarte a mejorar sin importar dónde estés. Estos son algunos de nuestros favoritas:

  1. Memrise –Esta aplicación fue diseñada por un Gran Maestro de la Memoria y un neurocientífico para ayudar a la gente a aprender idiomas de forma más eficiente y poder recordar mejor. Puedes elegir entre un conjunto de vocabulario, o puedes crear el tuyo propio.

www.memrise.com

  1. Quizlet – Esto también te ayudará a aprender vocabulario, pero con fichas. Puedes estudiar las palabras primero, y luego ponerte a prueba de diferentes maneras. Si tienes una lista de palabras que necesitas aprender para una clase o para un examen, entonces puedes entrar en la aplicación y aprenderlas en un abrir y cerrar de ojos

www.quizlet.com

  1. Wordreference – Todos usamos Google Translate para ayudarnos a entender nuevas palabras, pero esta aplicación de diccionario es mucho mejor. Incluye muchos idiomas diferentes, como francés, español, italiano, árabe y mucho más. También le ayudará a entender mejor la gramática de la palabra y te dará ejemplos de oraciones.

www.wordreference.com

  1. Macmillan Sounds – Esta es una gran aplicación para mejorar la pronunciación, ya que muestra todos los diferentes sonidos que usamos en inglés. Puede pulsar un sonido y luego repetirlo hasta que estés satisfecho con tu pronunciación.

http://www.macmillaneducationapps.com/soundspron/

¿Hay alguna otra aplicación que te guste? ¡Cuéntanos sobre ellas!

Categories
Academic IELTS apps B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation free apps GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English online english Southampton Summer School websites

Canciones para aprender inglés

Los profesores de idiomas utilizan las canciones como parte de su repertorio de enseñanza en el aula. Las canciones contienen lenguaje real, son fáciles de memorizar, proporcionan vocabulario, gramática y aspectos culturales y además son divertidas.  

A través de ellas puedes escuchar una amplia gama de acentos como inglés británico, caribeño o americano, entre otros. 

Las letras de las canciones pueden ser utilizadas para relacionarse con situaciones del mundo que nos rodea. Estas letras proporcionan una valiosa práctica oral, auditiva y lingüística dentro y fuera del aula.  

Por lo tanto, te traemos una selección de canciones con las que podrás aprender o reforzar diferentes puntos gramaticales de la lengua inglesa. 

“Dust in the Wind” by Kansas 

Usamos el tiempo presente simple para hablar de cosas que suceden comunmente o con frecuencia en el presente o para hablar de características de personas o cosas. 

“And She Was” by Talking Heads  

En realidad existen varias formas para los tiempos continuos en inglés. Hay tiempos continuos para el pasado, presente y futuro, y también hay un continuo perfecto para el pasado, presente y futuro. 

“Summer of ’69” by Bryan Adams 

Usamos el pasado simple para describir las cosas que empezaron y terminaron en el pasado. En otras palabras, se trata de acciones completadas. 

 “Ready to Run” by The Dixie Chicks 

Hay varias maneras de hablar sobre el futuro en inglés, las más comunes son: 

-El futuro simple (“will“). 

-El futuro continuo (“will” y un verbo terminado en –ing). 

-La estructura “going to” (una forma de “be” más “going to” más un verbo). 

-El presente continuosi incluimos una palabra de tiempo futuro. 

“We Can Work It Out” by The Beatles 

Los verbos pueden ser difíciles, principalmente porque pueden significan cosas diferentes. 

“Always On My Mind” by Elvis Presley  

Los modales perfectos se construyen con un modal más “have” más un verbo en participio pero los usamos para hablar del pasado 

 

“Thinking Out Loud” by Ed Sheeran 

“If “If It Hadn’t Been For Love” by Adele 

“I Were A Boy” by Beyoncé 

Usamos condicionales para hablar sobre posibles acciones y los resultados de esas acciones. Normalmente los dividimos en cuatro tipos: 

– Cero Condicional. 

– Primer condicional: presente o futuro. 

– Segundo Condicionalpresente irreal. 

– Tercer Condicionalpasado irreal. 

“Stressed Out” by Twenty-One Pilots  

También hay diferentes maneras de hablar de los deseos. 

Tenemos dos personas, y la primera es la que pide o tiene un deseo y la segunda es el tema de ese deseo. La mayor diferencia es que los deseos son irreales o imposibles, así que necesitas cambiar el segundo verbo al pasado para indicar que es irreal. 

“Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd 

El reporter speech o estilo indirecto es uno de los aspectos gramaticales que más confusión presenta entre los estudiantes. 

 

¡Practica y diviértete con esta selección de canciones! 

Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation English Courses eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English Southampton Study Abroad

Cambridge vs. IELTS – Welche Prüfung ist die richtige Wahl für mich?

Einige der häufigsten Fragen, die uns von den Studenten gestellt werden, sind: Worin besteht der Unterschied zwischen Cambridge-Prüfungen und IELTS oder Welche Prüfung sollte ich ablegen? Es sind die 2 größten Prüfungen in Großbritannien, also werfen Sie einen Blick auf unsere praktische Tabelle unten, um zu entscheiden, welche für Sie die Beste ist. 

 

  Cambridge  IELTS 
Prüfungsarten  Verschiedene Prüfungen für verschiedene Stufen – KET (A2), PET (B1), FCE (B2), CAE (C1) und CPE (C2)  Die gleiche Prüfung für alle Stufen, aber Sie entscheiden sich für Akademisches Englisch oder Allgemeines Englisch. 
Benotung  Wenn Sie die A-C-Note bestehen oder aber scheitern solltenbekommen Sie, wenn die Stufe hoch genug war, trotzdem ein Zertifikat von der darunter liegenden Stufe.  Sie erhalten eine Punktzahl zwischen 1-9. 
Lerngebiete  Lerngebiete – Sprechen, Hören, Schreiben, Lesen und Gebrauch des Englischen (letzteres konzentriert sich auf Grammatik und Wortschatz).  Lerngebiete – Sprechen, Hören, Schreiben und Lesen   
Zertifikat  Sie erhalten ein Zertifikat, das für immer gültig ist.  Ihr Zertifikat wird in der Regel nur für zwei Jahre nach Ablegung der Prüfung an entsprechenden Institutionen akzeptiert.  
Zweck  Um ein Allgemeines Englischniveau nachzuweisen; akzeptiert von einigen Universitätskursen.  Um an eine Universität in Großbritannien zu gehen; für einige Arten von Visa; um im NHS (National Health Service= Nationaler Gesundheitsdienst) zu arbeiten. 

 

Wenn Sie sich nicht sicher sind, denken Sie darüber nach, warum Sie eine Prüfung ablegen wollen – machen Sie es, um Ihr allgemeines Niveau belegen zu können oder einen Kurs an der Universität zu besuchen? Oder um einen Job oder ein Visum zu bekommen? Auf der Website der jeweiligen Organisation finden Sie heraus, was sie brauchen – oft werden beide Arten der Prüfungen akzeptiert.  

Cambridge vs IELTS – Which one to choose?

Categories
Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English Southampton

Hospedarse en Southampton

Coste de vida en Southampton

Si planeas venir a Southampton es importante tener en cuenta el coste de vida en la ciudad, debes asegurarte de que puedes afrontar los gastos. Es importante también tener en cuenta que la libra es una moneda cuya conversión no es la mismo que el euro y hay que tenerlo en cuenta a la hora de pagar porque podemos pensar que estamos pagando menos por un producto cuando en realidad estamos pagando más o igual cuando en realidad

10£ = 11.69€                      10€ = 8.56£

50£ = 58.46€                      50€ = 42.78£

120£ = 140.30€                    120€ = 102.66£

El coste medio es entre 800£ y 1000£, aunque esto dependerá de nuestro estilo de vida.

Tabla de precios estimados

 

Alojamiento

Existen muchos tipos de alojamientos, pero si quieres ahorrar tiempo y dinero te recomendamos que busques alojamiento en un sitio cercano a la escuela.

Alquilar una habitación:

La manera más económica vivir en Southampton es compartiendo casa o piso pagarás por una habitación entre 300£ y 600£, algunas incluirán facturas otras no por lo que se le sumará alrededor de unas 100£. Puedes buscarlo en páginas web como Spareroom para compartir alojamiento con trabajadores o otros estudiantes. En grupos de Facebook como españoles en Southampton podrás encontrar múltiples de anuncio de personas que ofrecen habitación.

Alojarse con una familia:

En Eurospeak te ofrecemos alojamiento con host-families donde podrás vivir en casa de una familia en su mayoría británicas, tendremos en cuenta los gustos de ambas partes para asegurar una agradable convivencia.

Residencia de estudiantes:

El alojamiento en residencia para estudiantes es una excelente manera de conocer a otros estudiantes y aprovechar al máximo el tiempo en Reino Unido. Las estancias de corta duración solo están disponibles en verano, por lo que le recomendamos consultar la disponibilidad antes de venir.

A 1 minuto andando de Eurospeak los precios varían de 150£ a 210£ a la semana.

Con precios desde 145£ a 285£

Comida

Restaurantes:

Southampton ofrece una gran variedad de comida podemos disfrutar de la comida local, o de cualquier otro país encontraremos restaurantes de comida Italiana, China, India… La academia EuroSpeak esta muy próxima a muchos restaurantes, algunos muy baratos y otros muy curiosos al igual que abundan las cadenas de comida rápida. También hay numerosas cafeterías cercanas para disfrutar de un tranquilo café.

Supermercados en Southampton

Si no quieres gastar mucho dinero te recomendamos que hagas la compra y cocines en casa. Te recomendamos a continuación algunos supermercados económicos y otros de comida de más calidad.

En el Reino Unido, existen gran variedad de supermercados donde puedes realizar la compra de tu comida. Como es de suponer, los precios y calidades de los productos varían entre los distintos supermercados. Algo muy curioso es la cantidad de comida para llevar o platos precocinados que encontrarás en ellos

Los supermercados más económicos

  • LIDL, como en España encontramos una gran variedad de alimentos
  • ASDA no solo hay comida, sino que tienen otros productos también
  • Iceland,es un supermercado peculiar, ya que el 90% de la comida que vende es congelada, por lo que la calidad es más baja
  • Aldi

Supermercados normales:

La calidad y variedad de la comida es buena y los precios son aceptables y están dentro de lo normal para la zona.

  • Sainsburys
  • Tesco
  • The Co-operative

Los supermercados más caros:

Estacan por su calidad y variedad en productos frescos, pero obviamente, esto se paga caro.

  • Waitrose
  • Marks & Spence
  • Poundland:Poundland es una mezcla entre un supermercado básico y una tienda de chinos española, en la que no solo podrás encontrar alimentos básicos y envasados sino también un gran surtido de elementos y utensilios para la cocina, oficina y casa en general. Su precio es inmejorable ya que… ¡todos sus productos cuestan solo £1!

Tiendas de barrio:

Existencia de mini-supermercados de barrio, regentados normalmente por indios o pakistaníes, donde en un reducido espacio puedes encontrar un poco de todo. Seguramente tengas uno más cerca de casa que cualquier super pues hay uno en cada calle y te vendrá muy bien para necesidades puntuales.

Tabla de precios estimados

Categories
7th March Academic IELTS B1 Test CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation Festivities GCSE English IELTS Preparation Irish Language Learning Language School Learn English Life in Reading online english Reading Southampton St Patrick Day Summer School

St. Patrick Day – Traditions

 

St. Patrick’s Day – St Patrick day traditions

Every 7th of March St. Patrick day is celebrated, this traditional festivity comes from an ancient story and has a lot of symbolic elements. Discover the history and the meaning of them:

  • The Shamrock

The shamrock, which was also called the “seamroy” by the Celts, was a sacred plant in ancient Ireland because it symbolized the rebirth of spring. By the seventeenth century, the shamrock had become a symbol of emerging Irish nationalism.

  • Irish Music

Music is often associated with St. Patrick’s Day—and Irish culture in general. From ancient days of the Celts, music has always been an important part of Irish life. The Celts had an oral culture, where religion, legend and history were passed from one generation to the next by way of stories and songs.

  • The Snake

It has long been recounted that, during his mission in Ireland, St. Patrick once stood on a hilltop (which is now called Croagh Patrick), and with only a wooden staff by his side, banished all the snakes from Ireland.

In fact, the island nation was never home to any snakes. The “banishing of the snakes” was really a metaphor for the eradication of pagan ideology from Ireland and the triumph of Christianity. Within 200 years of Patrick’s arrival, Ireland was completely Christianized.

  • Corned Beef

Each year, thousands of Irish Americans gather with their loved ones on St. Patrick’s Day to share a “traditional” meal of corned beef and cabbage.

Though cabbage has long been an Irish food, corned beef only began to be associated with St. Patrick’s Day at the turn of the century.

Irish immigrants living on New York City’s Lower East Side substituted corned beef for their traditional dish of Irish bacon to save money. They learned about the cheaper alternative from their Jewish neighbors.

  • The Leprechaun

The original Irish name for these figures of folklore is “lobaircin,” meaning “small-bodied fellow.”

Belief in leprechauns probably stems from Celtic belief in fairies, tiny men and women who could use their magical powers to serve good or evil. In Celtic folktales, leprechauns were cranky souls, responsible for mending the shoes of the other fairies. Though only minor figures in Celtic folklore, leprechauns were known for their trickery, which they often used to protect their much-fabled treasure.