Categories
Academic IELTS English Courses eurospeak Eurospeak Reading

ENGLISH EDUCATION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM: EUROSPEAK LANGUAGE SCHOOLS

History & Tradition

Eurospeak was established in the city of Reading in November 1991 as a language school focused on English education. Over time, Eurospeak stands out as one of the largest English language schools in the Berkshire region, thanks to its professional staff and strong vision. Eurospeak, which continues its activities continuously and growing, opened its second branch in the city of Southampton in October 2018.

Categories
CAE Exam Preparation English Courses English Exams English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English General IELTS Grammar IELTS Exam Preparation IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English online english Reading University Southampton Study Abroad Summer School Uncategorized Vocabulary writing

EASILY CONFUSED WORDS

English has a lot of words that can be easily confused not only by those of you learning English, but also by those of us studying English, and by ‘native’ speakers. English is a rich mix of different influences; very little survives of the original Celtic language from the original inhabitants of the British Isles apart from place names such as York; Church Latin brought by the Roman’s persisted until the sixteenth century; the Germanic Anglo-Saxon ‘settlers’ colonised the eastern and southern part of Britain by the 5th century. Then came the Viking invasions in the 9th and 10th centuries; they brought the influence of Old Norse. In 1066, the Norman conquest of England began bringing a heavy Norman French influence. Then with Britain’s expanding trade and eventually Empire new words entered the language brought not only by the British but the Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch empires thought trade.

There are also many inconsistencies in spellings; there are homographs (wind and wind), homophones (capital and capitol) and homonyms (produce the verb and produce the noun).

Confusion can come about when the meaning is misunderstood by the listener. When we learn a new language, or study our own language, enter a new job or read a new book we are confronted by new words that can confuse us in the form of faddy neologisms or jargon.

It took me a few days to stop using the Spanish word coger in South America; I could no longer coger el colectivo I had to tomar el colectivo (take the bus) in South America. In English there are a number of ways we can confuse ourselves; the first are the superficial differences between the ‘Englishes’ usually to do with spelling or semantics – the meaning of a word. For example, there were two computer programmers; one from America and one from England. When the English programmer and finished writing his program, he sat down to watch a TV programme; then, when the American finished her program she sat down to what her TV program. Which program or program you use depends on where you are and what you are doing. In the next two examples the meaning of each sentence is different; In England it is quite acceptable to say “I’ve never seen such a gorgeous ass”; you would be complimenting someone on their donkey, but using the exact same words in the United States could land you in gaol or is it jail? I get easily confused by these two words. There are also confusions brought about by time, for example, until the early twentieth century, it wasn’t unusual for people of a certain education to say, “I’m feeling rather gay today.” This meant “I’m feeling rather happy.” During this time people sometimes said they felt rather ‘queer’ or strange; both gay and queer have different meanings today – in the early twenty-first century; these are prime examples of the semantic shift in words. England also has a fantastic culinary tradition; one such culinary delight is the faggot; I love faggots and regularly eat them – faggots in England are large meatballs by the way. However, I am sure this is still an arrestable offence in some parts of the United States and the wider world.

Time has also changed the meaning of wicked and cool; in the late 1990s they meant something like fantastic or really good. In today’s news media the words snowflake and gammon have taken on a new meaning. These words are often used as terms of abuse in the news media it is debatable how much they are used outside the confines of newspapers and troll or water armies. Confusion can also occur through pronunciation; in the American ABC comedy TV series Modern Family the character Gloria Delgado-Pritchett played by the American-Columbian actor Sofía Vergara is asked by her husband to get some baby cheeses and she orders lots of baby Jesuses. But there is also confusion brought about by homophones; for example, which of the following means to be still or not moving? In her Grammarly blog Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English, Brittney Ross mentions two confusing words: Complement and Compliment; both words are spelt differently; they both have different meanings but the same pronunciation both for the verb and noun forms. So, what happens when we hear these words, how do we learn how to spell them? Stationary or stationery? Confused? It’s common to confuse these two words even among so-called ‘native’ speakers, so look at the two words in context: The train was stationary, so I popped into the stationery store and got these envelopes and pens. How do I get around the problem? In my head I tend to stress the final vowel in both words and remember the context; that helps me remember the spelling. And there are the principles and principals: There are fundamental principles we all live by; one of them is that we shall not steal. Many school principals have at least a master’s degree is the headmaster of a school. How do you remember which is which? Well you could use spelling mnemonics; for example, my pal is a school principal. The other way of confusing you is the non-transparent spelling system; we don’t always mean or say what is written; in English vowels aren’t pronounced or used. Take, for example, the word chocolate; in Spanish all the vowels are pronounced, in English we are lazier and drop the second ‘o’ vowel sound, so it’s pronounced as choclate.

So, knowing how a word is pronounced and practicing can often help our spelling, but there is also the problem of the spell check; how many of us have used the spell check and this marvellous device has sent the wrong word making us look completely illiterate? Embarrassing isn’t it! As Brittney Ross says in her Grammarly blog Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English ‘your word might be spelled right, but it may be the wrong word.’ We also have the double entendre is a figure of speech that has two meanings or interpretations; this form of ambiguity can cause confusion in meaning, for instance, newspaper headlines are notorious for this; take for example this headline, ‘Strikes to Paralyse Travellers’; does it mean that travellers will be physically paralysed or does it mean that the infrastructure will be paralysed and travellers won’t be able to travel? Anther confusing example is that 21 taxes choke tourism operators – Parliament cries; a parliament crying because tourism operators were choked by twenty-one taxes!

Chris Scott February 2020

Reference List

Brittney Ross [n.d.], Top 30 Commonly Confused Words in English, Grammarly blog, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.grammarly.com/blog/commonly-confused-words/ >.

Mirror.co.uk 17 August 2016, Strikes to Paralyse Travellers, Mirror, viewed 30 December 2019, < https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/strikes-to-paralyse-travellers-638297 >

Richard Annerquaye Abbey January 24, 2019, 21 taxes choke tourism operators – Parliament cries, viewed 30 December 2019, https://thebftonline.com/2019/editors-pick/21-taxes-choke-tourism-operators-parliament-cries/

Categories
English Exams English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton Language Learning Language School Learn English Southampton Study Abroad

Prüfungsvorbereitung: 5 Wichtige Tipps…

Wir alle wissen, wie schwierig und stressig die Tage vor den Prüfungen sein können. Wir warten ungeduldig auf das Ende dieses Albtraums. Aber es gibt einige wirklich gute Tipps, die Ihnen helfen werden, dieser Situation mit Zuversicht zu begegnen.  Als erstes…
  1. Organisieren Sie Ihren Lernplatz!

Achten Sie darauf, dass Sie genügend Platz haben, um Ihre Lehrbücher, Notizen und PC unterzubringen. Zusätzlich sollten Sie das richtige Licht für Ihr Zimmer und einen bequemen Schreibtischstuhl haben. Beseitigen Sie alle Ablenkungen und stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie sich bestmöglich konzentrieren können. Für einige Menschen bedeutet das fast völlige Stille. Im Gegensatz dazu hilft Anderen Hintergrundmusik.

Über all dem sollten Sie Ihr Handy  jedoch konsequent auf stumm lassen und Ihre Zeit nicht mit Spielen oder Social Media verschwenden. 

 

  1. Trinken Sie genügend Wasser!

Denken Sie daran, dass eine ausreichende Flüssigkeitsversorgung für Ihr Gehirn unerlässlich ist, um optimal zu arbeiten. Achten Sie also darauf, dass Sie während Ihrer Vorbereitung und auch am Prüfungstag immer viel Wasser trinken. 

 

  1. Organisieren Sie Lerngruppen mit Freunden!

Zusätzlich können Sie mit Freunden eine Lerngruppe organisieren. Wahrscheinlich haben Sie Fragen, auf die Ihre Freunde eine Antwort wissen und umgekehrt. Solange Sie sich alle einig sind, dass Sie sich für eine bestimmte Zeit auf das Thema konzentrieren, kann dies eine der effektivsten Möglichkeiten sein. Denn Sie fordern sich selbst heraus und können zusätzliche Tipps bekommen.

 

  1. Üben Sie alte Prüfungen!

Eine weitere effektive Weise, sich auf Prüfungen vorzubereiten, ist mit früheren Prüfungsversionen zu lernen. Dies hilft Ihnen, sich an den Aufbau der Fragen zu gewöhnen und – wenn Sie die Zeit messen  entwickeln Sie so auch das richtige Zeitgefühl für die einzelnen Abschnitte. 

 

  1. Regelmäßige Pausen& Snacks!

Und schließlich müssen wir natürlich noch zwei weitere wirklich wichtige Tipps erwähnen. Und zwar: Regelmäßige Pausen und Snacks nicht vergessen! Dies ist mindestens genauso wichtig, wie genügend Wasser zu trinken.

Studien haben gezeigt, dass für eine langfristige Wissenserhaltung die regelmäßigen Pausen sehr hilfreich sind. Jeder ist anders, also entwickeln Sie Ihre eigene Lernroutine. Wenn Sie morgens besser lernen können, beginnen Sie früh und machen mittags eine Pause. Wenn Sie nachts produktiver sind, machen Sie früher am Tag eine größere Pause, damit Sie bereit sind, sich am Abend auf den Lernstoff zu konzentrieren. 

Auch wenn Ihnen wahrscheinlich nach einer Belohnung in Form von Süßigkeiten ist oder Sie glauben, nicht genügend Zeit zum Kochen zu habensollten Sie trotzdem versuchen sich während der Lernphase gesund zu ernähren. Dies kann wirklich einen Einfluss auf das Energieniveau und die Konzentration haben, also halten Sie sich von Junk Food fern. Versorgen Sie Ihren Körper und Ihr Gehirn ausreichend mit Nährstoffen, indem Sie nahrhafte Lebensmittel wählen. Die Konzentration und das Gedächtnis werden nachweislich unterstützt von z. B. Fisch, Nüsse, Samen, Joghurt und Heidelbeeren.

Viel Erfolg bei der Vorbereitung und Prüfung! 

English version:

EXAM PREPARATION: 5 IMPORTANT STUDY TIPS

Categories
English Language School eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton General IELTS Grammar Language Learning Learn English Reading Southampton Study Abroad

Grammatik lernen für den Alltag

Meistens verwenden wir ein unterbewusstes Wissen, wenn wir in unserer Muttersprache sprechen. Wir denken nicht viel darüber nach, wie wir sagen sollen, was wir denken, wir sagen es einfach. 

Wenn wir eine zweite Sprache lernen, entwickeln wir oft eine ganz andere Art von Wissen. Ein Wissen, das bewusst ist und mentale Anstrengungen erfordert. Zum Beispiel wissen wir, dass Verben in der Gegenwart in der dritten Form Singular ein -s angehängt bekommenDiese Art von Wissen während des Sprechens zu nutzen fällt uns jedoch viel schwerer. Das liegt daran, dass der Zugriff auf dieses Wissen in Echtzeit nicht einfach ist. Gleichzeitig müssen wir auf viele andere Aspekte des Gesprächs achten. Das Ergebnis ist, dass wir am Ende zwar die richtigen Sprachkenntnisse haben, diese aber während der fließenden Kommunikation nicht anwenden können. 

Die meisten Experten in diesem Bereich des Zweitspracherwerbs sind sich heutzutage einig, dass wir zur Überwindung dieser Schwierigkeit viel Übung benötigen. Nach dieser Ansicht kann die Praxis der Anwendung unseres bewussten Wissens uns helfen, allmählich ein unbewusstes Wissenssystem aufzubauen. Dieses wiederum ermöglicht es uns schließlich, eine zweite Sprache so zu sprechen, wie wir unsere Muttersprache sprechen: Fließend, spontan und mühelos. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Die Praxis kann eine Reihe von Aktivitäten umfassen, von den traditionelleren Übungen, die für ein Grammatikbuch typisch sind, über kommunikativere Unterrichtsaktivitäten bis hin zu Gesprächen außerhalb des Klassenzimmers. Alle diese Arten von Praktiken sind von Vorteil, wenn nicht sogar notwendig, aber vor allem hängt ihre Wirksamkeit davon ab, ob wir unser bewusstes Wissen nutzen oder nicht. Wenn wir also beispielsweise die Verwendung einer Grammatikregel lernen wollen, sagen wir, das Anhängen      von -s, um einfache Verben in der dritten Person Singular zu präsentieren, müssen wir versuchen, diese Regel während der Übungen richtig zu verwenden. Dies wird in der Anfangsphase erhebliche Anstrengungen erfordern, aber der Aufwand wird mit zunehmender Übung allmählich abnehmen. 

Das heißt Sie brauchen sich keine Sorgen mehr machen und sollten stattdessen versuchen, Ihre Grammatik im Alltag mehr anzuwenden.

Viel Erfolg dabei wünscht Eurospeak!

 

English version:

LEARNING GRAMMAR FOR REAL COMMUNICATION

Categories
CAE Exam Preparation Culture English Courses English Exams English Language School English Testing eurospeak Eurospeak Reading Eurospeak Southampton FCE Exam Preparation GCSE English IELTS Preparation Language Learning Language School Learn English online english Solent University Southampton Southampton University Summer School Universities in UK websites writing

SeaCity Museum, Southampton

Last week was amazing; I visited the SeaCity museum in Southampton with my friend Hassan.  I learned a lot about Southampton’s history and the Titanic.  Actually, I got very excited watching the Titanic film. 

While we were at the museum, we talked about what happened, and we visualised the lack of safety boats on the Titanic and how this changed for future ships.  In my opinion, there is no person to blame, but this was the result of a sequence of mistakes and wrong decisions.  

The important thing is that we get the benefits of what happened and maybe try to avoid such events again. 

Mustafa A.

October, 2019